HOUSE PLANS FOR A 100 YEAR-OLD FARMHOUSE

Do you remember the 100 year old farmhouse that I posted about a few months ago? The client was a former interior design student of mine at CSUC who had recently purchased an old farmhouse with the intent to remodel. She was having trouble coming up with a floor plan that she liked. And though there was talk about adding on some additional space, the clients first wanted to see if they could fit everything into the existing floor plan. Their goal was to simplify life, to live with less and enjoy experiences over things.

WHITE CENTURY HOUSE

PROJECT GOALS

After accessing the space and the clients cost concerns I went to work and based the floor plan designs on the following:

  • Use the existing space the best way possible without adding on

  • Eliminate additional cost to exterior by maintaining existing door locations, especially as it related to the front elevation

  • Maintain as many existing window locations as possible

I was concerned that if the front door was eliminated or relocated to the side of the house that the architecture would be cheapened. Given the clients budget, I didn’t want to propose changes that would require a much larger budget than they had expected in order to make it look intentional and well designed.

Take a look at the existing floor plan. 

EXISTING FLOOR PLAN

As built, the front door faces the road and has a charming presence, but like what often happens with rural homes, the clients’ family and friends use only the side door. Even so I thought it was important to make sure that IF someone came to the front door there would be a place to receive them. So with that, I maintained the space immediately inside the front door to serve that purpose while providing a gathering place for the family, or sitting room for master bedroom. This also allowed me to maintain the windows on the front of the house, and the fireplace and windows on the side of the house.

Within the existing footprint of the house, I needed to fit the following:

  • Master bedroom with private bathroom

  • If possible, separate tub and shower in the master bath

  • Two kids bedrooms that are obscured form the main living spaces of the house

  • Laundry

  • Storage / closets

  • Kitchen, with no upper cabinets, with shelves instead

  • Dining

  • Great room

  • Office space, if possible

SPATIAL ADJACENCIES, BALANCE & LINES-OF-SITE

  • While designing the space I took care to make sure the adjacencies between each space made sense.

  • I created balance between windows, architectural features and built-ins

  • I made sure to obscure any line-of-sites from the public areas of the house to the private areas.

FLOOR PLAN OPTIONS

Here’s what I came up with.

OPTION A - FLOOR PLAN

OPTION A - PERSPECTIVE PLAN

OPTION B - FLOOR PLAN

OPTION B - PERSPECTIVE PLAN

OPTION C - FLOOR PLAN

OPTION C - PERSPECTIVE PLAN

OPTION D - FLOOR PLAN

OPTION D - PERSPECTIVE PLAN

OPTION E - FLOOR PLAN

OPTION E- PERSPECTIVE PLAN

DESIGN CONCEPT BOARD

Based on the clients concept photos and their desire to have a modern / bohemian aesthetic, here’s a concept board that I put together for the kitchen design.

PROJECT UPDATE

After presenting the plans to the clients they decided that staying within the existing plan wasn’t going to give them what they needed after all. So from there the client used the floor plan options I provided as a springboard. Inspired, feeling unstuck and with a larger budget, the client set to work redesigning a new plan with additional space and changes to the exterior. My role in the project then changed to being the interior design teacher again, much like we did many years ago. I corrected, revised and gave feedback to the client’s work. 


THE TAKE AWAY

  • It’s not uncommon for the scope and budget of a project to evolve during the design process. Through this exploration it allows for clients to better define what their priorities are. In this case it was determined that the increased budget for the project was necessary for the clients to really get what they wanted. 

  • No matter if it’s new construction or remodels and additions, there are always project limitations. Often the concerns are things like easements, structural issues, views, egress, and of course budget. So with that, it becomes a give-and-take. I encourage clients to weight out the pros and cons and then move forward with with a plan that best fits their needs.

GETTING THE MOST FROM THE WALLS OF YOUR HOME

Is a new build or remodel project in your future? TF Design would love to help you get the most out of the walls of your home. You can connect with me here.

Cheers!

Tami

Photo Credit: Lindsey King Photography